Search for content in message boards

What is the difference between ans Esq., Gent. & Yeoman?

What is the difference between ans Esq., Gent. & Yeoman?

Posted: 1408114654000
Classification: Query
I have seen all three used after names both in my family and in general. I know that they probably have something to do with land owenership but not sure. Can anyone explain to me the difference and could someone go from one distinction to another during their lifetime.

Re: What is the difference between ans Esq., Gent. & Yeoman?

Posted: 1408507433000
Classification: Query
The answer depends in part on the context, location, and time frame in which they're being used, but in general, a yeoman is a farmer who owns his own land. He would have lower social standing than a gentleman, who may be independently wealthy and whose income would probably come from managing a business or investments rather than doing the labor himself. In the UK, a gentleman would probably have the right to a coat of arms.

Esquire is more of a title than an occupation, and indicates that a commoner has achieved the social standing of a gentleman.

These are generalizations, but that's basically how they're used in most cases.

Steve

Re: What is the difference between ans Esq., Gent. & Yeoman?

Posted: 1408578044000
Classification: Query
Thank you Steve. The time period is the early to mid 1800's in Staffordshire.

Re: What is the difference between ans Esq., Gent. & Yeoman?

Posted: 1524331555000
Classification: Query
Generally in England at that time Esquire was used of a man who did not have a title but who was a member of the "gentry", a younger son of a minor aristocrat for example, but it was coming into more general use for any respectable man by the mid 19th century. Gentleman means much the same but might be used of anyone who had private means and did not have to work for a living. Mr Darcy in Pride and Prejudice is described as a gentleman. A yeoman was a farmer who owned his own land as opposed to a tenant. The yeoman would have managed his own farm and employed labourers and farm servants. if he could run to employing a farm manager or agent then he would probably be called Gentleman. There were plenty of Gentleman farmers!
per page

Find a board about a specific topic