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Understanding a workhouse admission form

Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1493246820000
Classification: Query
Hi

Please see attached record which I have only just come across for an ancestor. So many questions!

What does 'By whose Order' mean, who had him committed? If so, what or who is Goldsmith? And on discharge 'By whose order' does 'To father' mean he was released to his father or did his father request his release?

On the second document, what is a diet class? and what do all the letters and numbers mean for parish and after date of order of admission?

Many thanks for any help or pointers to where I might find the answers!!

Andrea
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Re: Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1493296670000
Classification: Query
Edited: 1493563630000
Without any names, dates, or locations it may be difficult to help. If your ancestor lived in the UK, this site might hold some clues for you: http://www.workhouses.org.uk/

Re: Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1493323839000
Classification: Query
Thanks for this, I will have a look at the website.

Maybe the attachments didn't come through, should I put the details in a message on this thread?

Thanks for the tip though!

Andrea

Re: Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1493382157000
Classification: Query
Yes, please always add the details to the subject line and message field so no one has to jump through hoops to help.

Re: Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1493489392000
Classification: Query
OK, the entry is on the 1895 Workhouse Admission form for the City Road Workhouse, in Holborn. My ancestor is Francisco Dellino. He was born in 1881, and in the column 'By whose order' it reads 'Insane' Goldsmith?. He was inside from March 18th to April 3rd, when he was discharged 'To Father'. His religion is listed as RC, and his class for diet is 3? His parish is listed as C? and Goldsmith is noted again. In the column 'If born in the house, name of parent' it reads 27 S? The final column is his address, which is correct, 35 Warner St.

If anyone has any ideas on the points where I have a ? that would be great!!

Many thanks

Re: Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1494198284000
Classification: Query
Workhouses by this period had different diets for different ages, genders, etc. Francisco seems to be on a youth's diet as there is another person of similar age further down the page also on class 3 diet. Most people are on class 2 which was presumably a standard adult diet.

Next meal after admission was supper, so he was admitted during the afternoon.

Religion was Roman Catholic.

The parishes the workhouse served are all abbreviated. The records of the poor law board or other local authority that this workhouse was operated by will list the parishes and hopefully enable you to work out which parish would be charged for his upkeep whilst in the workhouse.

Goldsmith is the surname of the person responsible for his admission. The name occurs in both images you posed and many times in one of them. Mr.Goldsmith's official title and hence role in the admission would hopefully be explained by examining other records of the relevant poor law board or other local authority.

I can't hazard a guess at the annotation 2y in the final column it occurs against a number of people.

The annotation S in the final column is for single i.e. unmarried. The clue to this was that some of the older admissions are annotated W for widowed.

The administrative records of the workhouse may help with your queries but these may not have been digitised and the originals would have to be examined in whichever local archive holds them.

Good luck with your research!

Re: Understanding a workhouse admission form

Posted: 1494270539000
Classification: Query
Thank you very much for this! I need to learn to look at the other entries on a form like this, not just the person I am interested in, there are clues there.

The pointers you have given are very helpful, and I believe that there are records I can check both online and at the local history centre. For interest, I think the parish was considered Clerkenwell which was where the family lived, not where the workhouse was.

Onwards, the research never ends! Many thanks again

Andrea
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